BLAST at 100 – A Centenary Symposium

This year marked the centenary of the publication of BLAST 1, the infamous first issue of an assemblage of Modernist prose, poetry, drama and visual art. The magazine was to initiate the Vorticist movement, and subsequently shock, move, and bewilder its contemporary audience. Published on the eve of the First World War – the first…

Trinity LitFest Speakeasy

The Trinity Literary Festival never disappoints. This year, among other events, the line-up for the week consisted of a Joycean Evening at Sweny’s Pharmacy, one of the locations featured in Ulysses; a publishing symposium with a guest appearance from John Boyne, author of The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas; a Harry Potter-themed debate based on…

Review: Short Term 12

Every now and then, a film comes along that disproves every stereotype of its genre. Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12 is centred on the lives of helpers at a foster home for disadvantaged teenagers. However, any preachy images this may conjure remain surprisingly absent throughout. The film opens with pensive, understated cinematography and a…

Review: Money by Martin Amis

Published in 1984 and set amidst 80s greed, consumerism and the illusion that monetary value is the only value, Martin Amis’ novel Money was written before the explosion of the internet. It tells the story of John Self, a self-made advertiser-turned-aspiring-film producer jetting between New York and London in a bid to shoot his first…

The New Woody Allen

For as long as I can remember, people have been complaining at how terrible Woody Allen has become. “His latest film’s female lead is hopeless”, the reviews would say, “nothing compared to Annie Hall”. Or, “The dialogues? Mostly dry – a pale shadow of Mr. Allen’s early Radio Days! Not to mention the dim portrayal…

Tromatized Yet?

  Considering that the Troma film industry is the longest running independent film industry, it remains relatively unheard of in the mainstream media. Specializing in explicit nudity, sexuality and a ridiculously copious amount of gore still unrivalled by their mainstream contemporaries, Troma movies have become synonymous with emetic, low brow and farcical fodder which serve…

Film Review: How I Live Now

How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff is a compelling read. Telling the story of a fictional 3rd World War in the 21st century, this dystopian apocalyptic tale explores the breakdown of an idyllic English countryside home hit by the effects of a nuclear bomb. I was apprehensive when Kevin MacDonald’s 2013 film was released…